Time Magazine's Person Of The Year Pick Is Pitch Perfect

BestsellerMagazine.com - Top news: TITLE

Time magazine declared “silence breakers” the Person of the Year for 2017, echoing and amplifying a sense, a hunch, a flickering of a notion that many of us feel but are afraid to utter aloud, lest we curse it:

Nothing will ever be the same.

A magazine can’t wipe out sexual harassment. Roy Moore may very well get elected to the U.S. Senate despite multiple allegations of preying on teenage girls. Donald “grab ’em” Trump still occupies the highest office in the land.

But to paraphrase Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.: The arc of the moral universe is long, but it’s starting to bend toward justice.

>>

“Women have had it with bosses and co-workers who not only cross boundaries but don't even seem to know that boundaries exist,” Time writes. “They've had it with the fear of retaliation, of being blackballed, of being fired from a job they can't afford to lose. They’ve had it with the code of going along to get along. They’ve had it with men who use their power to take what they want from women.

“These silence breakers have started a revolution of refusal, gathering strength by the day, and in the past two months alone, their collective anger has spurred immediate and shocking results: nearly every day, CEOs have been fired, moguls toppled, icons disgraced. In some cases, criminal charges have been brought.”

>
>#MeToo, but now what?
>

#MeToo has brought attention to the prevalence of sexual harassment and assault. These stories address advocacy vs. privacy, sexual violence in the LGBTQ community, survivor self-care and responses to assault disclosure. 

Before the silence breakers, sexual harassment had darkness and disbelief on its side. Now it has neither.

A Time survey of American adults conducted in late November found 82 percent of respondents said women are more likely to speak out about harassment since Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein’s early October downfall.

>

And 85 percent say they believe the women making allegations. They. Believe. The. Women.

That’s huge. That moves the needle as much as any high-profile ousting, any hastily assembled sexual harassment training, any shame-filled mea culpa.

By breaking their silence, survivors made 2017 the year we finally started listening. And their voices will echo for decades, in ways we can’t even begin to measure.

“The women and men who have broken their silence span all races, all income classes, all occupations and virtually all corners of the globe,” Time writes. “They might labor in California fields, or behind the front desk at New York City's regal Plaza Hotel, or in the European Parliament. They're part of a movement that has no formal name. But now they have a voice.”

And we have a blueprint for talking to our daughters and sons about sexual harassment: Don’t be a bystander. Use your voice. Speak up. Speak and speak and speak and speak some more until someone listens.

“There's something really empowering about standing up for what's right,” Susan Fowler, who blew the whistle over harassment at Uber, told Time. “It's a badge of honor.”

And it will change the world. It has, indeed, changed the world.

hstevens@chicagotribune.com

Twitter @heidistevens13

Related: Making room (complete with room service) for more women's voices »

The part of Taylor Swift's court case we should all commit to memory »

Let's make 2018 the year of pants — on cover models »

> > >
>Pesticide guide: The dirtiest and cleanest fruits and vegetables ranked

The annual Environmental Working Group Shopper's Guide to Pesticides in Produce was released April 10 with its "Dirty Dozen" and "Clean Fifteen," lists that rank the pesticide contamination of common fruits and vegetables. The lists are based on analysis of more than 38,800 samples taken by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Food and Drug Administration.

Pesticides are common on conventionally grown produce even after it has been washed and peeled, according to EWG, whose analysis found that nearly 70 percent of samples had pesticide residues.

This year, hot peppers were included on the "Dirty Dozen Plus" list. While they don't make EWG's traditional ranking criteria, nearly three-quarters of samples contained pesticide residues.

Click through the gallery to see how your favorite fruits and veggies fared. 

(Lauren Hill) >
>Go green: 10 fun houseplant ideas

Houseplants are having a moment. Not that they ever went out of style, per se, but thanks to millennials, home greenery is back with a vengeance. And we're not talking about your grandma's ferns. From whimsical air plants to vertical succulent walls, we've rounded up 10 houseplant ideas that will beautify your space and clean your air to boot. 

BestsellerMagazine.com, latest News Around the world presents the latest information of national, regional, and international, politics, economics, sports, automotive, and lifestyle.

Source : http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/stevens/ct-life-stevens-wednesday-time-person-of-the-year-1207-story.html

Time magazine's Person of the Year pick is pitch perfect
Here Are the Top Tweets About TIME's 2015 Person of the Year
The right way to complain when a business does you wrong
Bartolo Colon is still perfect in my heart, Khris Davis is an instant meme, and Dan Vogelbach is a thunderous lad
Sarsour, not Trump, most likely TIME’s person of the year
Obama and Cruz on short list for Time's 'Person of the Year'
Bernanke named Time magazine's Person of the Year
Nine Innings: David Price's New Vantage Point, Joe Mauer's Hall of Fame Candidacy and a Possible Reboot of the '86 Postseason
Exclusive: Chat is Google’s next big fix for Android’s messaging mess
Beware of Selling Yoga Pants on Facebook
[LIMITED STOCK!] Related eBay Products